5 Dust Collection Do’s and Don’ts for ANY Size Shop

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When it comes to setting up dust collection in a workshop, experience can be a valuable teacher. In this article, the author shares their top five do’s and don’ts for effective dust collection. Starting with a straight run as possible when coming out of the dust collector is key, followed by avoiding hard 90-degree turns and using as large of a pipe as possible for maximum airflow. Taping and caulking seams is also important to prevent leaks, while using custom blast gates can provide a superior solution to cheaper plastic options.

Key Takeaways:

  • Starting with a straight run from the dust collector is crucial for effective dust collection.
  • Avoiding hard 90-degree turns and using large pipes maximizes airflow.
  • Custom blast gates and taping and caulking seams can provide a superior solution to cheaper options.
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Starting with a Straight Run

When setting up a dust collection system, it is important to start with a straight run as much as possible when coming out of the dust collector. The straighter the run, the better the airflow. For smaller shops, the run may be shorter, but it is still important to keep it as straight as possible.

One of the key things to avoid is hard 90-degree turns, as they restrict airflow. Instead, gradual 45-degree turns should be used. Two 45-degree turns can be used if a quick turn is needed. Hard 90-degree PVC pieces and Ts should be avoided.

Using larger pipe sizes allows for the most airflow possible. While smaller dust collectors may not be able to handle six-inch pipes, using the largest pipe possible is still recommended. In this shop, a three-horsepower dust collector is used, allowing for the use of giant pipes. The return for a 25-horsepower dust collector is located inside the intake, which is made up of filters.

It is important to note that leaks can occur in the system, which lessens airflow. To prevent this, all seams should be taped and caulked. This will prevent fine dust from getting into the cracks of the tape and causing leaks.

Cheap plastic blast gates should be avoided, as they cannot clear dust effectively. Metal blast gates are better, but they can still leak and get bent over time, causing airflow to be restricted. A better option is to use blast gates that have no gaps and seal perfectly. These can be easily made using templates available for purchase.

Flex hosing should be avoided as it can bog down the system. Instead, hard pipe should be used as much as possible. A dust collection switcher can be used to incorporate the largest pipe possible and avoid long runs of flex hose.


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Avoiding Hard 90s

When it comes to good dust collection in any shop, there are certain do’s and don’ts that should be followed. The first and foremost rule is to avoid hard 90-degree turns as much as possible. This is because they restrict airflow and can lead to a buildup of dust in the system, which can cause problems in the long run.

Instead of using hard 90-degree turns, it is recommended to use gradual 45-degree turns, which allow for smoother airflow and less buildup of dust. These gradual 45-degree turns can be found in Y-pieces, which are better alternatives to hard 90-degree PVC pieces or T’s.

Using as big of a pipe as possible is another important factor to consider. This allows for the most airflow possible, which is crucial for effective dust collection. While smaller dust collectors may not be able to handle six-inch pipes, it is still important to use the largest pipe that the system can handle.

Taping and caulking all seams is also crucial for good dust collection. While tape alone may seem sufficient, it can fail over time and lead to leaks in the system. Therefore, it is recommended to use both tape and caulk to ensure that all seams are properly sealed.

When it comes to blast gates, it is important to avoid cheap plastic ones, which can restrict airflow and lead to buildup of dust. Metal ones are a better alternative, but they can still get bent over time, leading to leaks in the system. The best option is to use blast gates with no gaps, which seal perfectly and allow for maximum airflow. These blast gates are easy to make using templates and digital plans, and they are available in both six-inch and four-inch sizes.

Finally, it is important to avoid using flex hosing as much as possible, as it can bog down the system and lead to decreased airflow. Instead, it is recommended to use hard piping whenever possible, and to keep runs of flex hosing as short as possible. By following these do’s and don’ts, it is possible to achieve effective and efficient dust collection in any shop.

Using Large Pipes

When it comes to good dust collection in any shop, using large pipes is a must. According to the speaker, using larger pipes allows for the most airflow possible. However, the size of the pipe used depends on the size of the dust collector. In this shop, a three horsepower dust collector is used, which allows for the use of giant pipes.

The speaker recommends using as big of a pipe as possible. In this shop, they do not go down to four inches until they are almost at the tool. This makes a big difference in the shop, as it allows for maximum airflow.

Furthermore, the speaker emphasizes the importance of avoiding hard 90-degree turns, as they restrict airflow. Instead, they recommend using gradual 45-degree turns, which can be found in PVC pipes. The speaker recommends using two 45-degree turns instead of a 90-degree turn if a quick turn is necessary.

The speaker also recommends using blast gates that do not have any gaps, as gaps can lead to leaks and a decrease in airflow. The speaker does not recommend using cheap plastic blast gates or metal ones that can get bent and lead to leaks.

Finally, the speaker recommends taping and caulking all seams to prevent fine dust from getting into the cracks and causing leaks. The speaker learned from their previous shop that taping alone is not enough, and caulking is necessary to prevent leaks.

Overall, using large pipes is an essential component of good dust collection in any shop. By following the speaker’s advice on avoiding hard turns, using blast gates without gaps, and taping and caulking all seams, one can achieve optimal airflow and efficient dust collection.

Taping and Caulking Seams

When it comes to good dust collection in any shop, one of the top things to keep in mind is to tape and caulk all seams. This is a lesson that the speaker learned from their last dust collection system, where they noticed that fine dust had started to get in the cracks of the tape, causing it to fail and resulting in little leaks that allowed dust to spray all over the place. To avoid this, the speaker recommends taping and caulking all seams to prevent leaks.

While taping alone may seem like a good solution, the speaker warns that it may not be enough. This is because fine dust can still get into the cracks of the tape, causing it to fail over time. To ensure that all seams are properly sealed, the speaker recommends using both tape and caulk.

To demonstrate this, the speaker shows the viewer the seams in their current dust collection system that have been taped and caulked. They explain that this step may take some extra time and effort, but it is well worth it in the long run to prevent leaks and maintain good airflow.

Overall, taping and caulking seams is a simple but important step in achieving good dust collection in any shop. By taking the time to properly seal all seams, woodworkers can ensure that their dust collection system is working efficiently and effectively.


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Avoiding Cheap Plastic Blast Gates

When it comes to dust collection in a woodworking shop, there are a few key things to keep in mind to ensure optimal performance. One of the most important factors is the type of blast gates used to control airflow. As the speaker in the video explains, using cheap plastic blast gates can actually do more harm than good.

The problem with these types of blast gates is that they have a lip that restricts airflow, which can cause dust to build up around the gate. Over time, this can lead to leaks and reduced airflow throughout the system. Additionally, the gates can become bent or warped, which can further compromise their performance.

To avoid these issues, the speaker recommends using blast gates that are designed to seal perfectly and prevent any loss of airflow. He suggests using a system that he developed himself, which uses washers to ensure a tight seal and has no gaps to allow dust to accumulate. These gates are easy to install and can be made using simple tools and inexpensive materials.

Overall, the key to good dust collection is to use high-quality components that are designed to work together seamlessly. By avoiding cheap plastic blast gates and opting for a more reliable solution, woodworkers can ensure that their dust collection system operates at peak efficiency, keeping their shop clean and safe.

Using Custom Blast Gates

When it comes to dust collection in a woodworking shop, blast gates are an essential component. However, not all blast gates are created equal. In the past, the speaker has used cheap plastic blast gates that were prone to clogging and leaking. Metal blast gates were an improvement, but they still had issues with leaks and airflow restriction. That’s why the speaker designed a custom blast gate system that solves these problems.

The custom blast gates are made with PVC pipe and include washers to create a tight seal. Templates and plans are available for purchase to make it easy to create your own custom blast gates. The speaker recommends using the thinnest PVC pipe available to save money and ensure maximum airflow.

One of the benefits of the custom blast gates is that they can be easily labeled with green and red paracord to indicate whether they are open or closed. This saves time and effort when switching between tools in the shop. The custom blast gates also have no gaps, ensuring that there is no loss of airflow and minimizing leaks.

Another advantage of the custom blast gates is that they can be mounted on the wall, saving space and making them easily accessible. The speaker recommends using the biggest pipe possible for the main run, gradually reducing the size as needed. Flex hose should be avoided as much as possible, as it can bog down the system and reduce airflow.

Overall, custom blast gates are a great solution for anyone looking to improve their dust collection system. They are easy to make, cost-effective, and provide a tight seal with no loss of airflow. With the right materials and a little bit of effort, anyone can create their own custom blast gates and enjoy a cleaner, healthier workshop.

Using Dust Collection Switcher

When setting up a dust collection system, it is important to follow certain guidelines to ensure optimal performance. In this section, the speaker shares his top five do’s and don’ts for good dust collection in any shop.

Straight Run and No Hard 90s

Starting with a straighter run as possible when coming out of the dust collector is recommended. The straighter the run, the better the airflow. Hard 90-degree turns should be avoided as they restrict airflow. Instead, gradual 45-degree Y’s should be used for turning quickly.

Use Big Pipe

Using big pipe allows for the most airflow possible. It is recommended to use as big of a pipe as possible to ensure optimal performance. In this shop, six-inch pipe is used with a three horsepower dust collector. A 25 horsepower dust collector is used for CNCs with giant pipe.

Tape and Caulk Seams

Taping seams is not enough. The speaker recommends caulking and taping all seams to prevent fine dust from leaking through the cracks and failing the tape.

Avoid Cheap Plastic Blast Gates

Cheap plastic blast gates are not recommended as they cannot clear dust and restrict airflow. Metal ones are better but still have gaps and end up getting bent, causing leaks and lessening airflow. Blast gates designed by the speaker are recommended for optimal performance.

Dust Collection Switcher

The dust collection switcher is a useful tool for incorporating the biggest pipe possible and going smaller. It has a spring-loaded pin that opens up and locks in at each pipe, perfectly lining it up with the dust collection. Flex hosing should be avoided as it can bog down the system. The dust collection switcher helps to avoid this by incorporating a straight run and no hard 90s.


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Minimizing Use of Flex Hose

When setting up a dust collection system, it is important to minimize the use of flex hose. Flex hose can bog down the system and cause a decrease in airflow. To avoid this, it is recommended to use as big of a pipe as possible. This allows for the most airflow possible and helps to minimize the use of flex hose.

Another important factor to consider is the use of gradual 45-degree Ys instead of hard 90-degree turns. Hard 90-degree turns restrict airflow and can cause a decrease in performance. Gradual 45-degree Ys allow for a smoother transition and maintain a consistent airflow.

It is also recommended to tape and caulk all seams to prevent leaks. Fine dust can get into the cracks of the tape and cause it to fail, leading to leaks. Taping and caulking all seams helps to prevent this and ensures that the system is sealed properly.

When it comes to blast gates, it is important to avoid cheap plastic ones as they cannot clear dust effectively. Metal blast gates are a better option, but they can still leak and get bent over time. A better solution is to use a blast gate system that seals perfectly and has no gaps. The speaker recommends using a blast gate system that he designed himself, which is easy to assemble and has no gaps.

Finally, it is important to minimize the use of flex hose by incorporating a dust collection switcher. This allows for a straighter run out of the dust collector and minimizes the use of flex hose. However, it is important to avoid long runs of flex hose as they can bog down the system and cause a decrease in performance.

In summary, minimizing the use of flex hose is essential for maintaining good dust collection in any shop. Using as big of a pipe as possible, avoiding hard 90-degree turns, taping and caulking all seams, using a blast gate system with no gaps, and incorporating a dust collection switcher are all effective ways to minimize the use of flex hose and maintain a consistent airflow.

Planning for the Future

In his video, the speaker shares his top five do’s and don’ts for good dust collection in any shop. The first do is to start with a straighter run as possible when coming out of the dust collector. The straighter the run, the better the airflow. The speaker recommends avoiding hard 90-degree turns as they restrict airflow. Instead, gradual 45-degree Y’s are preferred. When turning quickly, two 45-degree Y’s are better than a 90-degree turn.

The second do is to use as big of a pipe as possible, which allows for the most airflow. The speaker uses a three horsepower dust collector and runs giant pipes. He recommends not going down to four inches until almost at the tool, as it makes a big difference.

The third do is to tape and caulk all seams. The speaker learned from his last dust collection video that taping alone is not enough. Fine dust gets into the cracks of the tape and causes leaks. Taping and caulking all seams prevent leaks and improves airflow.

The fourth do is to use blast gates that seal perfectly. The speaker recommends against using cheap plastic blast gates, as they cannot clear dust and restrict airflow. Metal blast gates are better, but they can get bent and cause leaks. The speaker designed his own blast gates, which are easy to make and seal perfectly.

The fifth do is to avoid using flex hosing, as it can bog down the system. Instead, use hard piping as much as possible. The speaker recommends incorporating a dust collection switcher to help with incorporating the biggest pipe possible and avoiding long runs of flex hose.

Overall, following these do’s and avoiding the don’ts will lead to good dust collection in any shop.

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